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Selected Poems and Prose

Edward Thomas - Author

Robert Macfarlane - Introduction by

David Wright - Compiled by

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ISBN 9780141393193 | 304 pages | 27 Aug 2013 | Penguin Classics | 5.07 x 7.79in | 18 - AND UP
Summary of Selected Poems and Prose Summary of Selected Poems and Prose Reviews for Selected Poems and Prose An Excerpt from Selected Poems and Prose
Finally back in Penguin Classics: the poems and prose of cult WWI writer Edward Thomas, with a new introduction by Robert Macfarlane, author ofThe Old Ways  

Beloved writer Edward Thomas is best known for his evocative poetry, though his writing career was varied and prolific, with more than two thousand reviews and nearly thirty volumes of topography, biography, and literary criticism published by the time of his death at age thirty-nine in World War I. After years of writing about poetry, Thomas, an intensely contemplative man who believed deeply in the power of perambulation, was encouraged by his close friend Robert Frost to write his own verse. This stunning collection includes some of his most treasured work and, with a beautiful introduction by bestselling author Robert Macfarlane, will bring Thomas’s extraordinary writings to a new generation of readers and aspiring writers.


Foreword

Acknowledgments and Note on the Selection


SELECTED POEMS AND PROSE


Prose


From ‘A Diary in English Fields and Woods’

To Gordon Bottomley. From Bearsted. March 17th, 1904

From Beautiful Wales
A Farmhouse under a Mountain
Llewelyn, the Bard
April

To Gordon Bottomley. From The Weald. July 26th, 1905

From The Heart of England
Leaving Town
Apple Blossom

To Gordon Bottomley. From Minsemere. February 26th, 1908

From The South Country
‘I Travel Armed Only with Myself’
Beeches
A Return to Nature
A Railway Carriage
The End of Summer
History and the Parish
An Umbrella Man

From ‘At a Cottage Door’

Hawthornden

The Attempt

Insomnia

Chalk Pits

Saved Time

People Who Live in Glass Houses Shouldn’t Throw Stones

Rain

’All These Things Are Mine’

The First Cuckoo

From In Pursuit of Spring
The Chiffchaff
The Other Man

From Walter Pater
Pater and Style

How I Began

From The Childhood of Edward Thomas
Infancy
Holidays

A Third-Class Carriage

Tipperary

It’s a Long, Long Way

This England


Poems

Up in the Wind

March

Old Man

The Sign-Post

The Other

After Rain

Birds’ Nests

The Manor Farm

The Combe

The New Year

The Source

The Penny Whistle

A Private

Snow

Adlestrop

Tears

Over the Hills

The Cuckoo

Swedes

The Unknown Bird

The Mill-Pond

[Man and Dog]

Beauty

[The Gypsy]

[Ambition]

House and Man

Parting

First Known when Lost

May 23

The Barn

Home

The Owl

The Child on the Cliff

Good-Night

But These Things Also

The New House

Sowing

March the 3rd

The Path

[The Wasp Trap]

Wind and Mist

A Gentleman

Lob

Digging

Lovers

In Memoriam [Easter, 1915]

Head and Bottle

Home

[Health]

[She Dotes]

Song

Melancholy

To-Night

The Glory

July

The Chalk Pit

Fifty Faggots

Sedge-Warblers

[I Built Myself a House of Glass]

Words

The Word

Under the Wood

Haymaking

The Brook

Aspens

The Mill-Water

For These [Prayer]

Digging

Two Houses

Cock-Crow

October

There’s Nothing Like the Sun

The Thrush

Liberty

[This is No Case of Petty Right or Wrong]

Rain

The Clouds that are so Light

Roads

The Ash Grove

February Afternoon [Sonnet 2]

P.H.T.

[These Things that Poets Said]

No One So Much As You

The Unknown

Celandine

’Home’

Thaw

Household Poems [1 Bronwen]

[2 Morfyn]

[3 Myfanwy]

[4 Helen]

[The Wind’s Song] [Sonnet 3]

Go Now

Tall Nettles

[The Watchers]

[I Never Saw The Land Before]

It Rains

The Sun Used to Shine

[Bugle Call]

As the Team’s Head-Brass

After You Speak

[Song 3]

[Sonnet 5]

Bob’s Lane

[There Was a Time]

The Green Roads

When First

The Gallows

[The Dark Forest]

When He Should Laugh

The Swifts

Blenheim Oranges

[That Girl’s Clear Eyes] [Sonnet 6]

[What Will They Do?]

The Trumpet

Lights Out

The Long Small Room

The Sheiling

The Lane

[Out in the Dark]


From Diary, 1 January—8 April 1917


Notes

Praise for Edward Thomas:

"The father of us all."
—Ted Hughes

"[B]y the fire in our strange habitation under the castle mound, nobody else at home, I read him at once, entire, knowing ever more certainly, poem by poem, that I loved him, he would be with me for life, I would learn from him."
—David Constantine in The Guardian


"With Wright's succinct notes, this might be considered the most fully representative edition of Thomas's work."
—John Greening, Times Literary Supplement



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