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The Inaugural Address, 2009

Together with Abraham Lincoln's First and Second Inaugural Addresses and The Gettysburg Address and Ralph Waldo Emerson's Self-Reliance

Barack Obama - Author

Hardcover | $12.00 | add to cart | view cart
ISBN 9780143116424 | 112 pages | 04 Feb 2009 | Penguin | 5.07 x 7.79in | 18 - AND UP
Additional Formats:
Summary of The Inaugural Address, 2009 Summary of The Inaugural Address, 2009 Reviews for The Inaugural Address, 2009 An Excerpt from The Inaugural Address, 2009
Tying into the official theme for the 2009 Inauguration, "A New Birth of Freedom" from Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, Penguin presents a keepsake edition commemorating the inauguration of President-elect Barack Obama with words of the two great thinkers and writers who have helped shape him politically, philosophically, and personally: Abraham Lincoln and Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Having Lincoln and Emerson's most influential, memorable, and eloquent words along with Obama's much-anticipated historical inaugural address will be a gift of inspiration for every American and a keepsake for generations.

Includes:

* Barack Obama, Inaugural Address, 2009
* Abraham Lincoln, Second Inaugural Address, 1865
* Abraham Lincoln, The Gettysburg Address, 1863
* Abraham Lincoln, First Inaugural Address, 1861
* Ralph Waldo Emerson, Self-Reliance, 1841

From The Inaugural Address, 2009 by Barack Obama:

We remain a young nation, but in the words of Scripture, the time has come to set aside childish things. The time has come to reaffirm our enduring spirit; to choose our better history; to carry forward that precious gift, that noble idea passed on from generation to generation: the God-given promise that all are equal, all are free, and all deserve a chance to pursue their full measure of happiness.

In reaffirming the greatness of our nation, we understand that greatness is never a given. It must be earned. Our journey has never been one of short-cuts or settling for less. It has not been the path for the faint-hearted —for those who prefer leisure over work, or seek only the pleasures of riches and fame. Rather, it has been the risk takers, the doers, the makers of things —some celebrated, but more often men and women obscure in their labor—who have carried us up the long, rugged path towards prosperity and freedom.


From The Gettysburg Address by Abraham Lincoln:

It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.


From “Self-Reliance”by Ralph Waldo Emerson:

Let us affront and reprimand the smooth mediocrity and squalid contentment of the times, and hurl in the face of custom and trade and office, the fact which is the upshot of all history, that there is a great responsible Thinker and Actor working wherever a man works; that a true man belongs to no other time or place, but is the centre of things. Where he is, there is nature. He measures you and all men and all events. Ordinarily, every body in society reminds us of somewhat else, or of some other person. Character, reality, reminds you of nothing else; it takes place of the whole creation.


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